Friday, 13 May 2011

Georgian Architecture - Pollok House, Glasgow

Rear of Pollok House
Set within Pollok Park in Glasgow, Pollok House dates from about 1750 and is a fine example of Georgian architecture. Although it is now managed by the National Trust for Scotland, it was the ancestral home of the Maxwell family who had links to the original grounds for 700 years. Mrs Maxwell McDonald presented Pollok House to the City of Glasgow in 1966. Admission still remains free during the winter months from October to March and thereafter there is an admission charge to the upper floors of the house.

The old Servants’ Quarters in the basement now houses a shop and the lovely Kitchen Restaurant with its delicious home-baking and locally sourced food. These can be accessed at any time. The inside of the house is gracious and almost homely, although it does have a magnificent collection of art, including famous Spanish works by Goya and El Greco.
The gardens are beautifully laid out and are famous for the vast number of rhododendron species. Pollok Park itself is Glasgow’s largest country park, with plenty of woodland paths and trails, and the nearby Burrell Collection. The White Cart Water runs through the estate and is spanned by an 18th century bridge not far from the house. On some days, visitors can even see the working Clydesdale Horses, and there is a field of Highland cattle. All within easy reach of the centre of Glasgow.

The recent BBC television series set in Georgian times, Garrow's Law, was filmed partly in and around Pollok House because of its authentic 18th century architecture and grounds.


Bridge over White Cart Water
On a visit to Pollok House, it is easy to imagine walking about the house and gardens in the gracious clothes of the 18th century!

Romy

22 comments:

S.Durham said...

Lovely Rosemary,

I love historical architecture. The gardens and house are beautiful, makes me want to visit!

Sara

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Thanks a lot for leaving a comment, Sara! Nice to see you here. It really is a lovely house with great walks. Hope you get there one day.

Allison Knight said...

What a perfect place for a historical romance. (grinning) But if you write or read historical romances you know why. I'm saving these pictures in case I come up with a perfect plot. And I can just see Jane Austin roaming through the gardens.

Thanks for sharing.

Anne Gallagher said...

Beautiful place. Just another stop to make if I ever get a cross the pond.

Julie Eberhart Painter said...

Gracious living for the inhabitants. Georgian architecture and furniture is my favorite because it had good lines that suited my eyes and my fanny. I was an Interior Design major in college.
Julie

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Hi Allison - It is indeed, although I haven't used it yet! I've had one visit inside so far but we're not allowed to photograph the rooms, unfortunately.

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Hello Anne - thanks for visiting and leaving a comment. Hope you get across one day.

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Hi Julie - It was a very gracious period. I didn't know you did Interior Design.

Melanie said...

It's a beautiful place. Sort of reminds me of Haddo House in Aberdeenshire. I've been to Glasgow many times and have never been here. Will have to add it to my list of places to visit on my next trip abroad (preferably sooner than later).

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Hi Melanie -thanks for leaving a comment. I've never been to Haddo House but I'm sure there must be many such lovely houses, especially in England.

Bill Kirton said...

Wonderful place, and I was lucky enough to get free access to it for ages a few years back when I wrote the material which visitors listen to. I was particularly pleased that they agreed to let me write the descriptions of the servants' quarters in the form of dialogues between the various servants who might have worked there. It's actually the best example I've seen of the upstairs/downstairs divide - and in concept it was way ahead of its time.

Janice Horton said...

What a fabulous house. In such a place you can 'feel' the history and have a sense of the people that would have lived there over the years. I love that about old houses.

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Hi Bill - glad to see you on the B Fiction forum - hadn't thought of mentioning that to you, sorry! As I said there, I'm so impressed that you wrote the material for the voices. I'm definitely going back to have a proper walk around the house by myself and will listen to your dialogue. Beautiful place.

Rosemary Gemmell said...

I love that too, Janice. I remember that great day we had at Drumlanrig Castle and then the Costume Museum. So interesting.

Angelica Hart and Zi said...

Great post and we totally enjoyed the pics. What a great way to stir one's imagination.

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Thanks for leaving a comment, Angelica and Zi! You can just picture those ladies in long gowns, can't you?

Linda Kage said...

I would so love a maz garden in my back yard. Thanks for the lovely pictures and history. Fascinating.

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Hi Linda - glad you liked the photos. It's a fascinating house.

L. K. Below said...

Gorgeous photos. I love little windows into the past like this. I just wish I could visit in person!

Rosemary Gemmell said...

Thanks, Lindsay! Maybe one day...

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Joanne Barragan said...

Simply outstanding! Historical houses are timeless and elegant. And although modern houses are the trend these days, these historical houses will remain fixtures worthy of admiration.